Bunyip Whispers in The Dreamtime

© Suzanna Joy


Chapter 2

The Bunyip

(BUSH)

Narrator:

The bunyip yawned and sat up. She turned to see a gleaming sliver disappear...it was the tail end of the rainbow snake.

Bunyip:

(MURMURING TO HERSELF) Dreams, dreaming. All that dino stuff is past. 93 million years have past!

Narrator:

She moaned, and turning over to make herself more comfortable, she repositioned herself to sleep some more.

Bunyip:

(WORRIED TONE) What are we going to do? My sister down south says that the poor little Brown Bandicoot is in critical trouble. Feral cats are decimating them. We have to make a new plan about those darling creatures; their numbers have dwindled across this wide land.

Narrator:

Leaning back against the inside wall of the fig, she gazed upwards towards the branches framed against the sky.

Bunyip:

(STILL MURMURING TO HERSELF) Look at the strange way that these fig trees grow. This hollow interior could house many people inside. (CALL OUT ALOUD) What is the day like?

Narrator:

She hollered up to the parrots in the branches that rose up so high. One of them, wearing green pyjamas, looked out across the coast and called back.

Parrot:

Sunshine, sunshine today!

Narrator:

From Bunyip’s viewpoint there was a black hole that went up, up, up so high, that it became the frame for a tiny pinpoint of light that represented the outcome of the internal tunnel.

The old tree had grown with this emptiness all the way up to the top. Slipping into meditation, Bunyip's vibrations and energy drifted away in the air, away and across to the great one the father of them all. Father of all the local mountains. Ole Tib.

And so it was as the sun was climbing up towards midday, the bunyip shifted with irritation, dreaming of the happenings in those bad old daze before even the dinos.

Bunyip:

(REMINISCING OUT LOUD) That was when old Tib broke Coonowrin’s neck in a furious temper.(SOUND EFFECTS) In the days before the dinosaurs, Beerwah had been angry with her children because they would run away. She found it hard to keep up with them, as she was again great with child. Ole Tib had sent Coonowrin, the eldest Child Mountain, to watch after Ngun Ngun and Coochin, the twins; who had wandered off following the littlest Wild Horse mountain who liked paddling in the sea. Tibrogargan worried that the great rising of the waters would swamp them. But the young mountain, Coonie boy, was having such a good time getting up to mischief, not realising that his mother was pregnant again. He didn't pay any attention to his Daddy, and deserted her. Ole Tib completely lost it, and erupted. (SOUND EFFECTS ROCKS GRINIDING) He clobbered his son over the head.

Narrator:

The bunyip shivered involuntarily. It had been ghastly.

Bunyip:

Coonie has never been the same since. He frequently weeps over his cowardice. The rivers of tears flow down to the sea.

Narrator:

Today Tibrogargan the great Old Man Mountain and his wife Beerwah, stared from their craggy heights across to the Pacific, the mighty ocean separating the Australian landmass from the Americas.

(BOARDFADE)